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Philpot on Huntington
by J.C. Philpot

HUNTINGTON closely and faithfully discriminated between taking the mere lamp of profession in the hand and the vital necessity, upon which he insisted, of possessing the oil of God's grace in the heart if ever we are to enter heaven. (Matt. xxv. 1-13.) "This it was," says J. C. Philpot, "which especially made him obnoxious to the professing world as well as to the profane. You may take away almost anything from a man but his religion. To pronounce his faith a delusion, his hope a falsehood, and his love a lie ; to sift his profession till nothing is left but presumption or hypocrisy; to withstand his false confidence, and declare it to be worse than the faith of devils; to analyse his religion, beginning, middle, and end, as thoroughly and unreservedly as a chemist analyses a case of suspected poisoning, and declare the whole rotten, root and branch - can this be done without giving deadly offence? But this was the work that Huntington had to do."

Taken from THE KINGDOM OF HEAVEN TAKEN BY PRAYER by William Huntington. Available from Gospel Missions Choteau, Montana

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