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Thread: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    Mr. Gill...

    I mentioned this before. I was not responding to that article, I was addressing your article on the home page about giving arminians assurance. I have read it and find what I have stated. If you would like me to quote it i WILL. So please do not ban me. I think I can enjoy dialoguing with you Gill. Perhaps the fact that we are talkign about 2 different articles is the root of this issue. I just did nto know how to post the article on the home page and start a new thread with it. So i am not lying at all and i hope everyone can see it. My "attack" on you was not about the confessions of a hyper article, So because of my inability to know where to post responses, I just posted here.

    What is the topic at hand? I am ready. And I know your the Boss.

    God Bless you and your family Brandon

    Lion

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    Quote Originally Posted by lionovjudah
    Mr. Gill...

    I mentioned this before. I was not responding to that article, I was addressing your article on the home page about giving arminians assurance. I have read it and find what I have stated. If you would like me to quote it i WILL. So please do not ban me. I think I can enjoy dialoguing with you Gill. Perhaps the fact that we are talkign about 2 different articles is the root of this issue. I just did nto know how to post the article on the home page and start a new thread with it. So i am not lying at all and i hope everyone can see it. My "attack" on you was not about the confessions of a hyper article, So because of my inability to know where to post responses, I just posted here.

    What is the topic at hand? I am ready. And I know your the Boss.

    God Bless you and your family Brandon

    Lion
    Thank you Lion for clarifying this. However, by responding to that article in this thread, you have taken this topic off course. Anyway, since you're new, I will give you the benefit of the doubt, and I apologize for accusing you of intentionally lying. However, for someone who is new, you sure did come in guns blazing! I must admit, that seemed quite arrogant!

    If you want to discuss that article, feel free to post a new thread in the forum, but if you search, you can see that it has been discussed before.

    The topic here is the original post.

    Now - back to the original topic.... *sigh*
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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    PHEWWWWWWWWWWWWW!!!!!!!!!

    Brother, no need to apologize. Yes guns a blazing is to put it mildly. brandon, when will you listen to me. I have told you everythign you say, is what my wife says also. We have been together 14 years and she still has to whack me to straighten up.

    I dont even know what the original post was after all this... hahahahaha

    Thank you for not banning me and understanding.

    Lion

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    DG:

    I am currently not in seminary. I finished college and for various reasons am not in school currently. I hope to start at the PR seminary next fall. I am currently studying under Dabney, Lloyd-Jones, and Hugh Oliphant Old
    For whatever strength of arm he may have who swims in the open sea, yet in time he is carried away and sunk, mastered by the greatness of its waves. Need then there is that we be in the ship, that is, that we be carried in the wood, that we may be able to cross this sea. Now this Wood in which our weakness is carried is the Cross of the Lord, by which we are signed, and delivered from the dangerous tempests of this world.--St. Augustine

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    I have never been very sure of what the reformed view is actually teaching on the doctrine of 'santicfication'.

    A typical teaching would go something like this:

    'Sanctification has to do with holiness, the word meaning 'to make holy', and in their holy living God's people begin to show the glory of God and His grace"

    If sanctification is progressive, what is getting more holy? Certainly not my sinful nature (although sometimes the teaching seems to lead to this thought). My new nature is all of Christ, it is God who works in me to will and to do and we know that Christ cannot get more holy so what do you think the real idea is behind progressive sanctification? Do you think it is a type of works issue?

    I know more and more the total depravity of my own nature and I grow more and more in the Grace and knowledge of Jesus Christ, is that truly sanctification then? We have the mind of Christ, is it speaking to that?

    Could someone give a bit more insight into the 2 different thoughts on this, please?
    "To those who have no works-phobia, I will state that you are not trembling before the gospel" Robert R. Higby

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    Here's a good explanation of the reformed teaching on sanctification:


    The word "sanctification" means "being made holy." The word itself shows, therefore, that sanctification is not our own work (though we become active in sanctification), but God's work in us.

    This holiness, we have seen, is not optional but vitally necessary. Without it no person can see God (Heb. 12:14). He is the HOLY ONE (Is. 40:25, 41:14, etc.), and no one can stand in His holy presence without being holy (Ps. 24:3-5).

    But what is holiness?

    The basic idea of the word is that of separation. To be holy is to be separate. Thus, in the OT Israel was a holy people, separate from the other nations (Lev. 20:24-26). Among the Israelites themselves the priests were "holiness to the Lord" (Ex. 28:36) because their whole life was separate for God's service in the temple (I Chron. 23:13).

    Now the church is that separate and holy nation, and is also a nation of priests (I Pet. 2:9). The members must, therefore, be holy (I Pet. 1:15, 16).

    Holiness, however, always has two parts to it. It is always both separation from something, and separation unto something. Both are important.

    Believers are called first to be separate from both wickedness and wicked persons (II Cor. 6:14-18, Eph. 5:11-12). They cannot go out of the world (I Cor. 5:9-10), but must nevertheless separate themselves as much as possible from the company, the fellowship, the deeds, and the life of the ungodly. Above all they must keep themselves pure, "unspotted from the world" (Jas. 1:27).

    This separation between the church and the world, between believer and unbeliever, between light and darkness, is sometimes referred to as the "antithesis". II Corinthians 6:14-15 describes that antithesis.

    II Corinthians 6 also speaks, however, of the fact that we are separated unto God (vss. 16-18). Without this, holiness is not complete.

    To be separated unto God is to be consecrated and dedicated to Him, just as the priests were in the OT. It is being set apart for God's service with our whole life - our time, our possessions, even our body.

    Nor is this a part-time thing. To be holy, separated and consecrated to God, is not just for the Lord's Day or for a few hours on the Lord's Day. Our whole life has been purchased by Christ, belongs to God, is consecrated to Him, and must be lived in holiness. We must be holy in "all manner of conversation" (I Pet. 1:15).

    To that we are called. Because God is holy (I Pet. 1:15-16), because they are chosen and redeemed unto holiness (I Pet. 1:18-19, Eph. 1:4), because God has sent them His Holy Spirit (I Cor. 3:16-17) holiness is demanded of us. That call to holiness is heard repeatedly in Scripture. It is, as someone wrote, a serious call.

    Have you heard it?

    Have you obeyed it?" Rev. Ronald Hanko
    The following is also good. It is from a guide for teaching the catechism written by Herman Hoeksema.
    1. What further benefit do believers receive from Christ?
      The blessing of sanctification.
    2. What is the relation between justification and sanctification?
      Justification is the ground of our sanctification, so that the one can never be present without the other. Titus 2:14.
    3. What is the difference between the two?
      Justification is a judicial act of God and frees us from the guilt of sin; sanctification is a spiritual-ethical operation of God in us and delivers us from sins' pollution.
    4. What, then, is sanctification?
      It is that work of God whereby we are delivered from the dominion and pollution of sin and transformed according to the image of Christ. I Thessalonians 5:23.
    5. How does God perform this work in the believer?
      By the Spirit of the exalted Christ Who cleanses us from all sin. II Thessalonians 2:13.
    6. Is the believer made perfectly holy in this life?
      No, but even the holiest of God's children have only a small beginning of the new obedience. Isaiah 64:6; Philippians 3:12; Romans 7:18.
    7. How does sanctification manifest itself in the life of the believer?
      The believer earnestly strives with joy and delight to walk in all good works. Lord's Day 33.
    8. What are good works?
      Only those which proceed from a true faith, are done in accordance with God's law and are directed to His glory. Romans 14:23.
    9. Must a Christian do good works?
      Certainly, for good works are the purpose of his salvation that God may be glorified in him; and without holiness it is impossible to see the Lord. Matthew 5:156; Hebrews 12:14.
    10. What is the relation between sanctification and preservation?
      Those whom God sanctifies He preserves in holiness until their final salvation. John 10:27-29; I Peter 1:5.
    For whatever strength of arm he may have who swims in the open sea, yet in time he is carried away and sunk, mastered by the greatness of its waves. Need then there is that we be in the ship, that is, that we be carried in the wood, that we may be able to cross this sea. Now this Wood in which our weakness is carried is the Cross of the Lord, by which we are signed, and delivered from the dangerous tempests of this world.--St. Augustine

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    Thanks WB for your response on the reformed view of sanctification. I'm having a hard time putting down what I am trying to ask. This is my third try so I don't know if it will work or not.

    I used to ask my pastor "what are good works" (a means to be more sanctified, more holy, more set apart) and he never could actually tell me. Perhaps I was asking from a motive of wanting to please God with my works, etc. The catechism was taught, the verses you used, etc. but still there was no satisfaction for me in the teaching, I always felt as if I could or should do something (as if I really could).

    My sinful human reaction to my childhood was to become an idolater, one who put their trust in people and places, deeply put my trust. After becoming a Christian and after recognizing that sin I so wanted to repent of it. It was 16 long years later that the Lord granted me repentance and that was the first time I recognized what a 'good work' was according to Ephesians 2:10:

    "For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them"

    It was a good work that Christ had done IN me, not something I had done.

    I agreed with Brandon's post, especially that we do not progress in holiness, we are not more holy, nor more set apart by works that we do or don't do. Any work of sanctification has to be solely a work of Christ, don't you think?

    I still don't have this thought down as I wish it to be, perhaps after I sleep on it, it will come to me and then again, maybe not!

    BTW WB, I'm sorry to hear you are not in seminary, you would make a grand pastor/teacher.
    "To those who have no works-phobia, I will state that you are not trembling before the gospel" Robert R. Higby

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    Brandan:

    Hey, I get after someone else to spell your name correctly and I find in the last post I spelled it wrong.....isn't that how it always goes.

    Maybe I will just do BJK from now on, that's cool!!!
    "To those who have no works-phobia, I will state that you are not trembling before the gospel" Robert R. Higby

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    Could Sanctification be a past, present and futere event? I understand sanctification is all a work of the Spirit on us, and nothing we do can make us "more sanctified", but I see a Scriptural relation between sanctification and "Growing in Grace".. I see sanctification equaling election from eternity (called out, or set apart) sanctification as the spirit regenerates His elect(continuously growing in grace and knowledge of the truth) and sanctification as a process leading to glorification (Complete sanctification).

    For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified. Whereof the Holy Ghost also is a witness to us: for after that he had said before, This is the covenant that I will make with them after those days, saith the Lord, I will put my laws into their hearts, and in their minds will I write them; And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more. Now where remission of these is, there is no more offering for sin. Hebrews 10:14Ė18

    The elect were called out or set apart in eternity in the pleasure of God when they were placed into the covenant and given to Christ. They were then sanctified by being legally purchased and paid for in the blood shedding work of Christ at the Cross. They were then individually 'sanctified' when they were found and brought safely into the fold. They were each given the Holy Spirit and he began to 'sanctify' each sheep day by day. Christ will one day come again and totally finish his 'sanctifying' work as described in Ephesians 5:25Ė27. All of this began in a sanctification that took place before we were born.

    In closing, I found this quote and have it in my notes, but I dont know who wrote it.
    "What is the missing link in the chain of Romans 8 that stretches from eternity to eternity? Isn't it strange that the Apostle leaves out the word sanctification? Has Paul forgotten the whole idea of sanctification and perseverance? I think Paul deliberately left out sanctification for at least two reasons. First of all, in this argument, ultimate and total sanctification equals glorification and it is a 'done deal' in the mind and purpose of God. And secondly, all five links in the chain grow out of and are connected to the first link. The elect are "predestinated to be conformed to the image of Christ" only because they have been foreknown or "set apart" in electing love. Election is sanctification!"

    Grace and Peace

    Lion

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    From the Gospel Standard Articles of Faith:
    XIX We believe in the sanctification of God's people, the term sanctification signifying a separation and setting apart by and for God. This, in the child of God, is three-fold: i, by election by God the Father (Jude I); ii, by redemption by God the Son (John 17:19); and iii, by the almighty regenerating operation of God the Holy Ghost (Rom. 15:16.) We believe that the blessed Spirit is the Author of what is styled in Scripture the new creature, or creation (2 Cor. 5:17, Eph. 4:24), or new heart (Ezek. 36:26); being, in truth, an implantation of the Divine nature (2 Pet. 1:4), through which the child of God would, according to the inner man (Rom. 7:22), be holy as God is holy, and perfectly fulfil all the good pleasure of the Father's will; but groans being burdened, being constantly opposed by the contrary workings of the old man. (Rom. 7, Gal. 5:17.) We reject the doctrine of progressive sanctification, or that a child of God experiences such a gradual weakening, subduing, or rectification of the old nature, called in Scripture the old man (Eph. 4:22, Col. 3:9), or such a continued general improvement as shall make him at any time less dependent upon the communications of the Spirit and grace of Christ for all goodness, or less a poor, vile, wretched, helpless sinner in himself, and in his own estimation. (John 15 part of 5, 2 Cor. 3:5, Rev. 3:17.)
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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    First a message to Eileen! Sister, I'm going to answer your post soon. - Brandan Now here is what Don Fortner has to say about progressive sanctification...


    Don Fortner: Does the Bible teach ďProgressive Sanctification?Ē

    As it is commonly taught by men, the Word of God certainly does not teach "progressive sanctification". However, let me be clearly understood. This is what I mean and what is commonly taught by the term "progressive sanctification". It is the teaching that...The believer's old nature becomes less sinful and he becomes more holy by degrees.. .Believers, by their devotion and obedience to God become more holy, more acceptable to God, and thus earn greater degrees of reward in heaven by their works of sanctification.. Believers become more and more holy, until they are ripe for heaven and their sanctification ultimately buds forth in perfect glorification.

    The Bible does not teach that doctrine! Flesh is flesh. It cannot be sanctified. The old man is not sent to a hospital to be cured, but to the cross to be crucified. The notion of progressive sanctification in the sense described above, (progressively increasing holiness), is contrary both to the Word of God and the experience of all believers (Rom. 7:14-25; Psa. 73:1-22). In the Bible, men who knew God never talked about their increasing holiness, but about their overwhelming sense of sin. Someone once said, "We are a people with two natures, one that is holy and seeks after righteousness, and one that is corrupt. and seeks after sin. These two natures are not equal in power. The divine nature rules and reigns, but the evil nature will not bow nor serve.

    Yet, the Bible does teach that sanctification in the believer is a present, continual work of grace (1 Thess. 1:3-7; 5:23-24). Believers do grow in grace (II Pet. 3:18). If regeneration, the new birth may be compared to a wedding, our wedding to Christ, sanctification is the marriage itself. Sanctification is life in Christ arid living with "Christ in you." Wherever it exists there is a growing, increasing consecration to Christ, conformity to Christ, confidence in Christ, and communion with Christ.

    This sanctification is the work of God's free grace alone (I Thess. 5:23-24). Our works have nothing more to do with the accomplishment of sanctification than they do of justification. The Believer's works of righteousness are the result, not the cause of sanctification.
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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    Does believing in a "progressive sanctification" as a Work of God in us contradict scripture? Perhaps I am not understanding Gill and fortner correctly. I agree that nothing we do, pray, repent, obey will make us more sanctified or holy, but I see Scripture attesting to the fact that sanctification and holiness have groth to their life in us as imparted and worked by the Spirit. If this is as Holy as I am going to get, then God has failed miserably. Thats why I hold to the fact the He who began a good work in me, will complete it. If Sactification is a completed grace with no progression then why would Christ pry the Father in John 17:17 - "Sanctify them in the truth: thy word is truth.'' And again to mention Paul stating that "He who began a good work in me, will complete it" The future tense here indicates a future element of sanctification. Why did i start typing in bold font?

    In the present state of the regenerate, corruption still remains experience soon teaches us this. But I rejoice to know that the day is coming when God shall finish the work which He has begun; and He shall present my soul, not only perfect in Christ, but perfect through the Spirit, without spot or blemish, or any such thing.

    CHS wrote the following that. May the Spirit enrich our souls by reading it if He so wills.
    "Sanctify them through Thy truth." John 17:17
    The Spirit of God infuses into man that new living principle by which he becomes "a new creature" in Christ Jesus. This work, which begins in the new birth, is carried on in two ways mortification, whereby the lusts of the flesh are subdued and kept under; and vivification, by which the life which God has put within us is made to be a well of water springing up unto everlasting life. This is carried on every day in what is called "perseverance," by which the Christian is preserved and continued in a gracious state, and is made to abound in good works unto the praise and glory of God; and it culminates or comes to perfection, in "glory," when the soul, being thoroughly purged, is caught up to dwell with holy beings at the right hand of the Majesty on high. But while the Spirit of God is thus the author of sanctification, yet there is a visible agency employed which must not be forgotten. "Sanctify them," said Jesus, "through thy truth: thy word is truth." The passages of

    Scripture which prove that the instrument of our sanctification is the Word of God are very many. The Spirit of God brings to our minds the precepts and doctrines of truth, and applies them with power. These are heard in the ear, and being received in the heart, they work in us to will and to do of Godís good pleasure. The truth is the sanctifier, and if we do not hear or read the truth, we shall not grow in sanctification. We only progress in sound living as we progress in sound understanding. "Thy word is a lamp unto my feet and a light unto my path." Do not say of any error, "It is a mere matter of opinion." No man indulges an error of judgment, without sooner or later tolerating an error in practice. Hold fast the truth, for by so holding the truth shall you be sanctified by the Spirit of God

    Grace and Peace

    Lion

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    Dear Eileen,

    I think it is very important to address your post as these are very important questions. I think we have much in common! I'm not going to go into a long biblical proof, as I have several articles I can point you to regarding this topic. It appears there are very few individuals in the reformed churches that understand God's work of sanctification for and in His people. Today, about the only groups of people that seem to get sanctification right are the absoluter primitive baptists, the Gospel Standard Brethren, and the folks loosely affiliated with Don Fortner and somewhat related churches.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen
    I used to ask my pastor "what are good works" (a means to be more sanctified, more holy, more set apart) and he never could actually tell me. Perhaps I was asking from a motive of wanting to please God with my works, etc. The catechism was taught, the verses you used, etc. but still there was no satisfaction for me in the teaching, I always felt as if I could or should do something (as if I really could).

    My sinful human reaction to my childhood was to become an idolater, one who put their trust in people and places, deeply put my trust.
    Eileen, you and I have shared very similar experiences. Even after knowing the Lord, I remember looking too intensely at men with way too much trust.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen
    After becoming a Christian and after recognizing that sin I so wanted to repent of it. It was 16 long years later that the Lord granted me repentance and that was the first time I recognized what a 'good work' was according to Ephesians 2:10:

    "For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them"

    It was a good work that Christ had done IN me, not something I had done.

    I agreed with Brandon's post, especially that we do not progress in holiness, we are not more holy, nor more set apart by works that we do or don't do. Any work of sanctification has to be solely a work of Christ, don't you think?
    There was a time that I fell into legalism for a while - even after believing NCT. You see, I came to the conclusion that because I became a Christian, I concluded that while I was positionally sanctified in Christ, I had to work out my "practical holiness" "progressively". Anyone who didn't have "practical holiness" as I saw it obviously was not positionally sanctified in my opinion, so therefore, I concluded that anyone who did this, or that obviously concludes they're not a Christian. I remember my poor wife would watch a certain television show that I didn't deem appropriate, or she didn't feel like going to church on a particular Sunday. I remember one day I just said to her with what I thought was great love, "You must not be saved if you like this TV show, or you don't seem excited to go to church today." I put her under a yoke of obligation and hurt her very much. I made salvation dependent upon works - although I wouldn't ever admit to it - I made assurance dependent upon one's "progress" in what I perceived as sanctification. But do you know what? The entire time I was living like this, I was miserable. My flesh would want to do something awful, and I'd succumb to it. Some days, I seemed to live a lot worse than before I was converted. Do you have any idea what that will do to your assurance if you base it upon works? It can destroy it - and there were times I thought I might be a lost man. If you base your assurance on your progression in sanctification (ie. good works), you will be miserable, because as you go throughout your Christian walk, you become more and more aware of your sin and less aware of any "good" that you might do.

    I can tell you from experience that progressive sanctification is an evil doctrine - because it ultimately makes salvation dependent upon works. I can only wonder how many people have been broken by pastors and teachers who upon shortly after confession of Christ were taught that now they are new creation in Christ that in order to enter heaven God is going to have to prepare them through good works! As a Christian, you grow more and more aware of your sin as each day goes by; and your thankfulness to Christ grows as you realize with trembling how much more His love is for you - how much sin was indeed wiped out by His death for you on the cross. The good works you do strive to perform you will never be satisfied with, but you strive to perform them because you're irresistably moved to do them based on the love and grattitude you have for Christ. Furthermore, a Christian from the moment he is washed in the Holy Spirit and regenerated and brought into fellowship with Christ begins to experience eternal life. He is communing with Christ; and he is prepared instantaneously for glorification into heaven. He still retains his old sinful body, but he is looking for the salvation of that part of him too in the resurrection because he recognizes that positionally his body was raised with Christ at Christ's resurrection. He has a hope based on the certainty of Christ - not one based on what Christ is doing in Him. I consider progressive sanctification to be a holdover from the RCC and would recommend that all avoid it like the plague.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen
    I still don't have this thought down as I wish it to be, perhaps after I sleep on it, it will come to me and then again, maybe not!
    I think you have it. It's very simple. If you are a Christian, you're sanctified! You've been set apart and consecrated unto service. God sees you as perfectly holy in Christ and as a benefit of your sanctification you will continue to grow in grace and knowledge of our wonderful loving Savior by His Grace Alone.


    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen
    Brandan:

    Hey, I get after someone else to spell your name correctly and I find in the last post I spelled it wrong.....isn't that how it always goes.

    Maybe I will just do BJK from now on, that's cool!!!
    My parents and my wife still refer to me as "Beej". Spelling my name wrong isn't a concern to me. I just don't like it when it's misspelled on important financial papers. When I went through my first mortgage, my name was spelled "Brandon" on EVERY SINGLE document. I had to initial each and every part where my name was misspelled! And you know what they say about mortgages - bring a wheelbarrel!
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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    Some good articles on Sanctification

    Ye are Sanctified - Don Fortner (Definitive article on Sanctification in my opinion)

    Sanctification - Stanley Phillips (old school absoluter)

    Sanctification - Peter Vanhorn


    Sanctification - Gilbert Beebe



    Regional Sanctification : or Are You a Holder for Where You Live? - Peter Meney


    Sanctification Texts - Don Fortner




    Sanctification - Don Fortner
    This is my signature.

  15. #55
    Moderator Eileen's Avatar
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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    Brandan,

    Thank you so much for your reply to my post and for sharing your own experiences. As a Christian we struggle with many things and I am always edified when those of the faith share their own walk and their own struggles. As 1 Cor 10:13 says...."there hath no temptation taken you but such as is common to man". Isn't it the most wonderful thing that we don't have to base our assurance on our 'sanctification', or our 'good works'.

    If it were so, we would be most pitiful, for we have no good works. I appreciated what you said...... growing in Grace and in knowledge is a benefit of our sanctification in Christ. What a glorious benefit that is. I will ponder that in the days to come.

    I will be looking into the articles your posted tomorrow afternoon after I am full of turkey and pie and all the trimmings.

    Happy Thanksgiving!

    All of Grace!
    "To those who have no works-phobia, I will state that you are not trembling before the gospel" Robert R. Higby

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    Eileen:

    Thank you for your kind words. I wouldn't give up the time I have had with my son for anything though

    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen
    Any work of sanctification has to be solely a work of Christ, don't you think?
    Certainly. All sanctification is a result of God's work in us. Don Fortner sets up a false dichotomy acting as if a person must either believe in a progressive sanctification which is the result of the person's own work or a single one-time sanctification that is God's work. My position is that although the Scripture does speak of the latter, it also speaks of a continual sanctification which is also God's work.

    By God's grace we stop our idolatry. As we grow in grace we begin to see sin sin in nooks and crannys of our life which we had not seen before. We only know a small part of this obedience in our present state. We still need our daily foot washing. As part of our sanctification God chastises and gives us more and more knowledge of Him as our Father. He purges us of sin.
    For whatever strength of arm he may have who swims in the open sea, yet in time he is carried away and sunk, mastered by the greatness of its waves. Need then there is that we be in the ship, that is, that we be carried in the wood, that we may be able to cross this sea. Now this Wood in which our weakness is carried is the Cross of the Lord, by which we are signed, and delivered from the dangerous tempests of this world.--St. Augustine

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    Amen Chuck, I agree that the answer is not an either or, but a both/and.

    How old is your son? Our son is 8... Do not EVER give up time with him boar.



    Lion

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    Almost 10 months.
    For whatever strength of arm he may have who swims in the open sea, yet in time he is carried away and sunk, mastered by the greatness of its waves. Need then there is that we be in the ship, that is, that we be carried in the wood, that we may be able to cross this sea. Now this Wood in which our weakness is carried is the Cross of the Lord, by which we are signed, and delivered from the dangerous tempests of this world.--St. Augustine

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    10 months....WOOOOOOOOOOOOOHOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

    Are you getting any sleep? Our 2 children have always slept. Now a daughter that is 10 and our son, still sleep very well...

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    Re: Confession of a Hyper-Calvinist

    Quote Originally Posted by wildboar
    Certainly. All sanctification is a result of God's work in us. Don Fortner sets up a false dichotomy acting as if a person must either believe in a progressive sanctification which is the result of the person's own work or a single one-time sanctification that is God's work. My position is that although the Scripture does speak of the latter, it also speaks of a continual sanctification which is also God's work.

    By God's grace we stop our idolatry. As we grow in grace we begin to see sin sin in nooks and crannys of our life which we had not seen before. We only know a small part of this obedience in our present state. We still need our daily foot washing. As part of our sanctification God chastises and gives us more and more knowledge of Him as our Father. He purges us of sin.
    At what point in the believer's life is he totally sanctified WildBoar? Is a believer "MORE" sanctified after he's been a Christian for 10 years than before when he first believed? Is entrance into heaven dependent upon this progress in sanctification? What about assurance? Should a Christian base his assurance on the progress God is making in him? Thanks!
    This is my signature.

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