I just picked up a copy the Interlinear Greek-English New Testament of the 1550 edition of Stephanus and was wondering just how different it was from the 1624 edition of Elzevir?

More about the book I bought:

Book Description
This Greek-English Interlinear New Testament available at an excellent price will help the student of Greek to maintain a grasp of the original language and help the non-Greek-reading Bible student become acquainted with Greek.

From the Back Cover
First published in 1897, this time-tested study tool allows you to directly relate the Greek word or words behind the King James Version to the English text, and allows easier reading of the Greek New Testament. You'll obtain a better understanding of the Bible as a result. Unlike most interlinears, The Interlinear KJV Parallel New Testament in Greek and English is based on the Stephens 1550 Greek text (better known as the Textus Receptus). This gives you instant access to the original Greek text from which the King James Version was derived. To make your studies easier and deeper, The Interlinear KJV Parallel New Testament in Greek and English also provides: - A Greek English lexicon to unlock the meanings of words - A section of Greek synonyms to help clarify the relationships or words --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author
George Ricker Berry (1865-1945) taught semitics at both the University of Chicago and Colgate University. He provided the translation and notes for the Interlinear Hebrew-English Old Testament and the Interlinear Greek-English New Testament. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
The text used is George Ricker Berry's edition found in The Interlinear Literal Translation of the Greek New Testament (New York: Hinds & Noble, 1897). This text is virtually identical to editions of Disiderius Erasmus (1516, 1519, 1522, 1535), Complutensian Polyglot (1522, 1564, 1573, 1574, 1584, 1590, 1609, 1619, 1620, 1628, 1632), Simon Colinaeus (1534), Robert Stephens (1546, 1549, 1550, 1551), Theodore Beza (1565, 1582, 1588, 1598), and Bonaventure and Abraham Elzevir (1624, 1633, 1641). The edition first named "Textus Receptus" was Elzevir 1633 "textum ergo habes, nunc ab omnibus receptum."
Anyone else using this edition? I'm interested in learning Greek and have the Basics of Biblical Greek Grammar text and workbook by Mounce, hoping to start soon.


Thanks.

j