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Thread: Is the gospel telling people that God loves them and Christ died for them?

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    Is the gospel telling people that God loves them and Christ died for them?

    i just finished reading a wonderful book by Tom Wells called "Price for a People." (i highly recommend by the way) in it, the author brought up an amazing and almost shocking point. he said, that nowhere in the Bible is an unbeliever told that Christ died for them. in addition he said that in perhaps only two places does the Bible ever say that God or Christ loved someone (i.e., an unbeliever). one is where Jesus is said to have felt love for the rich young ruler (Mt 10:21). this doesn't help us. the other is john 3:16 which everyone should know well, "God so loved the world." but does this verse mean that God loves every individual in the same way and that He gave His Son to die for each and every individual who ever lived? i don't think so (read vv. 17-21). and to establish a practice based on one verse is a very short leg to stand to say the least.

    in the book of Acts, which should provide the best model for what we are to tell unbelievers when presenting the gospel, they never used the terminology many use today (e.g., "God loves you and has a wonderful plan for your life" or "Christ died for YOU"). in fact their message was that Christ was resurrected and is Lord and King and that you need to "lay down your arms" (i.e., repent) and embrace Him as your Lord and King (i.e., believe or have faith in Him). they only discussed the death of Christ in passing to establish that He was resurrected and that He is Lord and deserves your allegiance.

    why are the gospel presentations so shallow and unbiblical today?what should we do? what are your thoughts? how should we share Christ with those who don't know Him? what are the contents of the gospel message?

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    Re: Is the gospel telling people that God loves them and Christ died for them?

    Originally posted by disciple
    "...nowhere in the Bible is an unbeliever told that Christ died for them."

    "...how should we share Christ with those who don't know Him?"
    Response:

    Rom 5:6 For when we were yet without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly.
    I hope this verse above is complete and needs no further explanation that (A) God so loved the world, (B) God is no respector of persons, and (C) "Christ died for you" and me (who were ungodly / sinners).

    If not, please comment...

    Grace to you,
    HIS

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    Just a quick note:

    My point of contact with unbelievers is as follows:

    1. God created you.
    2. You're a sinner.
    3. Jesus died for ungodly sinners.
    4. God requires a living faith and relationship in/with Jesus if you are to be saved from fiery depths of hell.

    I cringe when I hear people say, "Jesus loves you", to the unsaved. We don't know if God died for the ungodly people we meet or not (He did in fact die for some of them). If He didn't, He doesn't love them. If so, who are we to throw His pearls to swine?
    This is my signature.

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    why don't the apostles use this formula in evangelizing the lost? obviously Christ died for sinners (i.e., ungodly). He didn't die for those who were already righteous. but, this is not the issue. the issue is telling people that Christ died for them. the apostles never did this. should we? plus in romans 5 Paul is addressing those who've already been justified (see vv. 1-2, 5, 6, 8-11; follow the we and us throughout) not the lost. defining the audience is one of the most vital issues when interpreting or applying Scripture. here Paul is not evangelizing or sharing the gospel with unbelievers but teaching believers of Christ's substitutionary death on their behalf.

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    Disciple,

    <On a different thread you said>
    basically b/c of the fall of adam, all men and women born since then are born sinful (not only in action but in nature; e.g., we sin because we're sinners NOT we are sinners because we sin). we all fell or sinned in adam (romans 5).

    Thereby demonstrating that Paul was indeed speaking of all of mankind when he said:

    "Therefore, as through one man's offense judgement came to all men, resulting in condemnation..."

    <Now here you said>
    plus in romans 5 Paul is addressing those who've already been justified (see vv. 1-2, 5, 6, 8-11; follow the we and us throughout) not the lost

    Somehow trying to support the belief that Jesus did not die for everybody sins. Interestingly, the above verse (Romans 5:18) continues by saying:

    “…even so through one Man’s righteous act the free gift came to all men, resulting in justification of life.”

    Now let me put those together:

    "Therefore, as through one man's offense judgement came to all men, resulting in condemnation, even so through one Man’s righteous act the free gift came to all men, resulting in justification of life.” (Romans 5:18)

    Regardless of who he is addressing, to imply that paul had two definitions for the same phrase, “all men”, in the same sentence is poor rendering of the scriptures. Paul plainly states here that the gift of justification has come to every human being. As with any gift, it can be accepted or rejected.

    Gareth


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    there are no contradictions except in your understanding of what i've said. obviously paul is addressing those who are justified as indicated by (rom 5:1-5). while he may be discussing universal issues or discussing the human plight and state without God He is addressing those who share with Him in being justified by faith (we, our, us, etc.).

    Romans 5:10 For if, while we were enemies, we were reconciled to God through the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, shall we be saved by his life; 11 and not only so, but we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received the reconciliation.
    only Christians are those who understand, apprehend, and appropriate these truths. only believers can speak in this way. if you were to carry your interpretation and logic through you would have to be a universalist. the literary device that i think you are missing in your reading of rom 5 is synecdoche. merriam webster has this for synecdoche:

    a figure of speech by which a part is put for the whole (as fifty sail for fifty ships), the whole for a part (as society for high society), the species for the genus (as cutthroat for assassin), the genus for the species (as a creature for a man), or the name of the material for the thing made (as boards for stage)
    note also the use of the terms the many, the one, and all in romans 5.

    Romans 5:15...For if by the trespass of the one the many died, much more did the grace of God, and the gift by the grace of the one man, Jesus Christ, abound unto the many. 16 And not as through one that sinned, so is the gift: for the judgment came of one unto condemnation, but the free gift came of many trespasses unto justification. 17 For if, by the trespass of the one, death reigned through the one; much more shall they that receive the abundance of grace and of the gift of righteousness reign in life through the one, even Jesus Christ. 18 So then as through one trespass the judgment came unto all men to condemnation; even so through one act of righteousness the free gift came unto all men to justification of life. 19 For as through the one man's disobedience the many were made sinners, even so through the obedience of the one shall the many be made righteous. 20 And the law came in besides, that the trespass might abound; but where sin abounded, grace did abound more exceedingly: 21 that, as sin reigned in death, even so might grace reign through righteousness unto eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.
    certainly all these things have come and are displayed to all without exception and without distinction that no man would be without excuse but it is obviously not effective or applicable or designed for all men without exception or distinction but only the elect. as calvin put it, "Let us remember, on the other hand, that while life is promised universally to all who believe in Christ, still faith is not common to all. For Christ is made known and held out to the view of all, but the elect alone are they whose eyes God opens, that they may seek him by faith."

    Titus 2:11, (NAS), For the grace of God has appeared, bringing salvation to all men, (for all to see; could be all types of men) 12 instructing us to deny ungodliness and worldly desires and to live sensibly, righteously and godly in the present age, 13 looking for the blessed hope and the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior, Christ Jesus, 14 who gave Himself for us to redeem us from every lawless deed, and to purify for Himself a people for His own possession, zealous for good deeds.

    Titus 3:4, (NAS), But when the kindness of God our Savior and His love for mankind appeared, 5 He saved us, not on the basis of deeds which we have done in righteousness, but according to His mercy, by the washing of regeneration and renewing by the Holy Spirit, 6 whom He poured out upon us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior, 7 so that being justified by His grace we would be made heirs according to the hope of eternal life.
    this He did in reality and not in mere potential. the Scripture never speaks in terms that God made it possible or gave the potential and that it will only be true if we do something about it. the Scripture says that He redeemed, He reconciled, He propitiated, etc. not that He made redemption possible, reconciliation possible, propitiation possible, etc. God did it and He did it for His people whom He foreknew, whom He called, whom He predestinated, whom He chose from before the foundation of the world apart from works according to His pleasure and will (eph 1 et al).

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    ...except for the part where it says "For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life" and "Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with him, and he with me."

    kermie, you said: "I cringe when I hear people say, "Jesus loves you", to the unsaved. We don't know if God died for the ungodly people we meet or not (He did in fact die for some of them). If He didn't, He doesn't love them. If so, who are we to throw His pearls to swine?"

    What kind of understanding of the Gospel is this? One of the fundamentally amazing truths of Christianity is that God became Man. is this not enough to demonstrate that God loves us? Perhaps we have not taken to heart the story of the Rich Young Man, about whom it is said: "Jesus looked at him and loved him (Mark 10:21)." Who knows whether this man repented and was saved? The text seems to suggest that he was unwilling to give up his wealth for the sake of the Pearl of Great Price. Nevertheless, Our Savior loved him! Or should we remind ourselves of Our Master's command in the Sermon on the Mount: "Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, that you may be sons of your Father in heaven. He causes the sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous. "
    If we are to love our enemies, how much more does God love His enemies! And if He loves only the enemies of His which He anticipates will eventually love him back, is He not being like one of us? No! He loves even those who will always hate Him! Jesus loved the rich young ruler, without pulling out a law book to determine first whether or not he was technically elect or not. Should we not also love everyone and proclaim God's love for everyone without discrimination? And if anyone is repeatedly not receptive to our message, then, and only then, is it appropriate to apply Mathew 7:6. Did not Christ love even the Canaanite woman who was not of the Elect race? (Mathew 15:24-28). Should we not also do the same?

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    Originally posted by Graham
    ...except for the part where it says "For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life"
    mentioned that one.

    and "Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with him, and he with me."
    if you're quoting rev 3:20 this is not an invitation to unbelievers to be saved but an invitation to believers to fellowship. look at the context.

    What kind of understanding of the Gospel is this? One of the fundamentally amazing truths of Christianity is that God became Man. is this not enough to demonstrate that God loves us? Perhaps we have not taken to heart the story of the Rich Young Man, about whom it is said: "Jesus looked at him and loved him (Mark 10:21)." Who knows whether this man repented and was saved? The text seems to suggest that he was unwilling to give up his wealth for the sake of the Pearl of Great Price. Nevertheless, Our Savior loved him! Or should we remind ourselves of Our Master's command in the Sermon on the Mount: "Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, that you may be sons of your Father in heaven. He causes the sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous. "
    If we are to love our enemies, how much more does God love His enemies! And if He loves only the enemies of His which He anticipates will eventually love him back, is He not being like one of us? No! He loves even those who will always hate Him! Jesus loved the rich young ruler, without pulling out a law book to determine first whether or not he was technically elect or not. Should we not also love everyone and proclaim God's love for everyone without discrimination? And if anyone is repeatedly not receptive to our message, then, and only then, is it appropriate to apply Mathew 7:6. Did not Christ love even the Canaanite woman who was not of the Elect race? (Mathew 15:24-28). Should we not also do the same?
    oh yes! wonderful truth that this is! God loved so much that He gave His only Son. and God is love (1 john 4:8). this is a beautiful and glorious truth. and yes God loves all mankind as He causes the sun to rise and fall on the just and unjust. but does He love all equally? oh that Christians would have more love for their neighbor. there is a great lack of love among so-called Christians today. love is to be our mark. you have said it right that we should love and that God loves. and we should love all and show our love for all men but we should have a special love for our brother in Christ (jo 13:34f; 1 john 3:10, 17, 4:20f). it is a glorious truth that God loves. it is amazing that He loves especially in light of our great unloveliness. but this is not the point. the point is that no one ever tells an unregenerate sinner that God loves them and Christ died for them. there is no example of this method or message of evangelism in the gospels or in acts. men are already comfortable in their sins and think too highly of themselves. they would love to have a God who simply winks at sin and asks nothing of a sinner but to realize that He loves them. why do we not follow the example of the apostles in the Gospels and Acts? their message is much different from the one we hear today. go read their account. instead today we are preaching a gospel invented by charles g. finney and campus crusade for Christ's Bill Bright. i don't know how long you've been a Christian or if you are but this whole thing relates to this message from campus crusade for Christ. it's called the four spiritual laws where people are told that "God loves them and has a wonderful plan for their life." yet we never hear this from Scripture or from the example of the apostles. why do we not follow them? why do we not follow the example of the Savior? He called people to repentance, to forsake their sin and follow Him. the apostles followed with the same message. sinners were told that God is the awesome holy creator, judge, and king and that He demands their repentance, faith, and allegiance. as the author of the book i just read said, they called sinners to put down their arms or weapons (repent) and give their allegiance to the Lord of the universe. this is the message we are to preach. we need to tell sinners that they've offended a holy God with their sin and that they need to give Him their allegiance. this does not negate or is not antithetical to God's love. God is love...but God is also the holy King.

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    that was a good word, disciple.
    I actually agree with you, basically 100%, just about. I was mostly trying to address the attitude of "We shouldn't tell people God loves them because God only loves the people for whom He died and He didn't die for all people." I believe that is a flawed mindset.
    However, I agree with you wholeheartedly that the so-called Gospel Campus Crusade (and Intervarsity, etc. etc.) teaches is no Gospel at all -- I'll be the first to say that the "Four Spiritual Laws" are a bunch of baloney -- and if I had the authority, I would anathematize all those who held that such "bafoonery" (to use a good Luther word) were actually spiritual LAWS! HA! The presumption we mortal men have! We were discussing in Sunday School one day the doctrine of Limited Atonement. One student asked concerning the "Four Spiritual Laws": "So does this mean we have to tell people, 'God doesn't necessarily have a wonderful plan for your life, but He might.'?" It was pretty humorous. Anyway...I think one of the most beautiful songs in Scripture is that of the Prophet Zechariah (Luke 1:68-79), which says his son, St. John the Forerunner, came to bring God's people the knowledge of salvation through the forgiveness of sins. John's Gospel message is: God has come in the flesh so repent! If only we would bring America the knowledge of salvation by proclaiming repentance instead of so-called "tolerance"! Peace in Christ to you.

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    I believe it was Charles Spurgeon who stated that, while he preached the doctrines of grace, his 'altar calls' were 'whosoever will.' One time, a lady asked him why. His reply was because he does not know whom the Lord was calling.

    I believe that the message of the gospel is 'Christ died for his own.' You are right, Graham, to state that the gospel of Scripture was 'god became flesh, therefore repent.' However, there is more to it than that. 'Why should I repent?' I can hear some say. And what would our answer be? God coming in the flesh was important to first century judaism (as well as other parts of the world), but even Paul was accused of changing his message between Jews and Gentiles. What I am trying to convey here is that our audience needs to be taken into account.

    Concerning the love of god to 'all men': This is nothing more than peoples attempts to make themselves 'feel' better. I state that with conviction, for I too was on of them. However, the counsel of scripture will not allow such a teaching. Jesus himself stated on different occasions for whom he would die:

    Matthew 20.28. ' "...the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many." ' (see also Mark 10.45)

    Matthew 26.28. 'for this is My blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for forgiveness of sins.' (see also Mark 14.24)

    These are not isolated passages. Isaiah wrote:

    Isaiah 53.12. 'Therefore, I will allot Him a portion with the great, And He will divide the booty with the strong; Because He poured out Himself to death, And was numbered with the transgressors; Yet He Himself bore the sin of many, And interceded for the transgressors.'

    In the book of Hebrews, it is written:

    Hebrews 9.28. 'so Christ also, having been offered once to bear the sins of many, shall appear a second time for salvation without reference to sin, to those who eagerly await Him.'

    What is interesting in all of these passages is that, not once does it state that Christ died for those who would believe in Him. The 'many' describes the total number of people for whom He died. Not once did Jesus state that he came to die for every single person ever born. Not once.

    Furthermore, those who espouse such an idea seem to forget those who died before the birth of Jesus and the preaching of the gospel. Paul emphatically stated that those 'Gentiles' who had died before the gospel, had 'no hope' and were 'without God' (Eph. 2.12). What do we do with those millions and millions of people? They never had a 'choice' in the matter.

    Further still, and in relation to that last point, if one considers the OC nation of Israel, we see that god chose whom would be his people. Everyone else did not 'know god' in the covenantal sence. That is, they did not have a covenantal relationship with god. Most people don't have a problem with god choosing Israel as his 'chosen people' and them alone in the OC. But when they come to Jesus and the gospel, god must change to include 'all people.' This is not consistent with the type and anti-type of Scritpure. The type being that god chose a nation to be his people; while the anti-type is they were a picture, a poetic image, of the true people of god who are 'from every tribe and tongue and people and nation' (Rev. 5.9).

    Lastly, concerning Romans 5 and Paul's use of the term 'all': I have gone over this before somewhere else on this great board, but I will just capstone my point here. Arminians love to use the 'all' verses from Romans 5, but fail to mention the 'many' verses tucked in there as well. Paul also wrote:

    Romans 5.15 'But the free gift is not like the transgression. For if by the transgression of the one the many died, much more did the grace of God and the gift by the grace of the one Man, Jesus Christ, abound to the many.'

    And:

    Romans 5.19. 'For as through the one man’s disobedience the many were made sinners, even so through the obedience of the One the many will be made righteous.'

    Paul, when he used the terms 'many' and 'all,' interchanged those terms. Unless one supports 'universalism' (the idea that every single person ever born will 'go to heaven'), one has to deal with the term 'many.'

    I believe that the answer is that Paul was speaking about the elect. The term 'all' refers to the total number of the elect within themselves; while the term 'many' refers to them among the rest of the world. Either way, some will have to deal with verses 15 and 19.

    Grace to you,

    jak

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    Here is a link to a great site for those interested in this subject.

    http://www.pbministries.org/books/gi..._archive.htm#5

    Grace to you,

    jak

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    Originally posted by disciple
    why don't the apostles use this formula in evangelizing the lost?.... the issue is telling people that Christ died for them. the apostles never did this.
    1 Corinthians 15:1-3

    "Moreover brethren I declare to you the gospel which I preached to you, which also you received and in which you stand, by which also you are saved....For I delivered to you first of all that which I also received: that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures..."

    When Paul came to the Corinthians, he told them "first of all" that Jesus died for their sins. Even if you maintain that he was only speaking to the elect among the Corinthians, the fact is that the beginning of the gospel that Paul used to evangelize these people was that Christ died for them.


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    ETL,

    You are forgetting one thing: Paul was writing to Christians. Look through the messages he preached. Not once does he state 'Christ died for all.' Check it out and see.

    Furthermore, do you think he would preach a message contrary to the statements of Jesus? I don't think so and Jesus never stated that he was going to die for 'all people.'

    Grace to you,

    jak

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    So, I was curious...and maybe this has been answered and I know it sounds like a very basic, almost childish question...but in the end, its what we are all wondering....

    As a Christian, how do we know we are chosen? We can spend our lives serving Him, and still perhaps end up in Hell? Is there a point? It seems more a gospel of hopelessness than of hope, to me. To know that it doesnt matter what we do, whether we "accept Christ" or not, we can still go to Hell....or if we are of the chosen and never accept Christ, we can go to heaven?

    Or am I getting this all wrong?

    I guess my views may be a little different on some of this...or maybe they are the same and Im not understanding other peoples views clearly?
    ~Madly in love with my Saviour

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    Originally posted by Nacmij!
    As a Christian, how do we know we are chosen? We can spend our lives serving Him, and still perhaps end up in Hell? Is there a point? It seems more a gospel of hopelessness than of hope, to me. To know that it doesnt matter what we do, whether we "accept Christ" or not, we can still go to Hell....or if we are of the chosen and never accept Christ, we can go to heaven?

    Or am I getting this all wrong?
    the question you need to ask is (in general) who are the ones who "accept Christ" or seek after Christ? some people phrase the question a little differently or give an interesting charicature of what is historically called "calvinism." they'd say: "calvinism is the theology that says that people who are seeking Christ (those who repent, believe, etc.) aren't allowed into heaven because they weren't elect." this is a charicature simply because, by definition, those who seek Christ (through the correct means by repenting and trusting in Him alone for salvation) are the elect. that's exactly what john 3:16 says. when asked about how john 3:16 worked with the elect issue, j vernon mcgee said, "the whosover will are the elect." only the elect are the ones who are truly seeking after Christ and only those who are truly seeking Christ are the elect.
    When I get a little money, I buy books; and if any is left, I buy food and clothes.
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    A room without books is a body without soul.
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    Ah, Thank you for the clarification! It is hard sometimes to understand what someone believes based on a few posts. This makes it much clearer...at least to me.
    ~Madly in love with my Saviour

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    Here is what Gill wrote in his commentary regarding Jo 3.16:
    Joh 3:16 - For God so loved the world,.... The Persic version reads "men": but not every man in the world is here meant, or all the individuals of human nature; for all are not the objects of God's special love, which is here designed, as appears from the instance and evidence of it, the gift of his Son: nor is Christ God's gift to every one; for to whomsoever he gives his Son, he gives all things freely with him; which is not the case of every man. Nor is human nature here intended, in opposition to, and distinction from, the angelic nature; for though God has showed a regard to fallen men, and not to fallen angels, and has provided a Saviour for the one, and not for the other; and Christ has assumed the nature of men, and not angels; yet not for the sake of all men, but the spiritual seed of Abraham; and besides, it will not be easily proved, that human nature is ever called the world: nor is the whole body of the chosen ones, as consisting of Jews and Gentiles, here designed; for though these are called the world, Joh_6:33; and are the objects of God's special love, and to them Christ is given, and they are brought to believe in him, and shall never perish, but shall be saved with an everlasting salvation; yet rather the Gentiles particularly, and God's elect among them, are meant; who are often called "the world", and "the whole world", and "the nations of the world", as distinct from the Jews; see Rom_11:12, compared with Mat_6:32. The Jews had the same distinction we have now, the church and the world; the former they took to themselves, and the latter they gave to all the nations around: hence we often meet with this distinction, Israel, and the nations of the world; on those words,

    ""let them bring forth their witness", that they may be justified, Isa_43:9 (say (b) the doctors) these are Israel; "or let them hear and say it is truth", these are "the nations of the world".''

    And again (c),

    "the holy, blessed God said to Israel, when I judge Israel, I do not judge them as "the nations of the world":''

    and so in a multitude of places: and it should be observed, that our Lord was now discoursing with a Jewish Rabbi, and that he is opposing a commonly received notion of theirs, that when the Messiah came, the Gentiles should have no benefit or advantage by him, only the Israelites; so far should they be from it, that, according to their sense, the most dreadful judgments, calamities, and curses, should befall them; yea, hell and eternal damnation.

    "There is a place (they say (d),) the name of which is "Hadrach", Zec_9:1. This is the King Messiah, who is, çã åøê, "sharp and tender"; sharp to "the nations", and tender to "Israel".''

    And so of the "sun of righteousness", in Mal_4:2, they say (e),

    "there is healing for the Israelites in it: but the idolatrous nations shall be burnt by it.''

    And that (f).

    "there is mercy for Israel, but judgment for the rest of the nations.''

    And on those words in Isa_21:12, "the morning cometh", and also the night, they observe (g),

    "the morning is for the righteous, and the night for the wicked; the morning is for Israel, and the night for "the nations of the world".''

    And again (h),

    "in the time to come, (the times of the Messiah,) the holy, blessed God will bring "darkness" upon "the nations", and will enlighten Israel, as it is said, Isa_60:2.''

    Once more (i),

    "in the time to come, the holy, blessed God will bring the nations of the world, and will cast them into the midst of hell under the Israelites, as it is said, Isa_43:3.''

    To which may be added that denunciation of theirs (k).

    "woe to the nations of the world, who perish, and they know not that they perish: in the time that the sanctuary was standing, the altar atoned for them; but now who shall atone for them?''

    Now, in opposition to such a notion, our Lord addresses this Jew; and it is as if he had said, you Rabbins say, that when the Messiah comes, only the Israelites, the peculiar favourites of God, shall share in the blessings that come by, and with him; and that the Gentiles shall reap no advantage by him, being hated of God, and rejected of him: but I tell you, God has so loved the Gentiles, as well as the Jews,

    that he gave his only begotten Son; to, and for them, as well as for the Jews; to be a covenant of the people, the Gentiles, the Saviour of them, and a sacrifice for them; a gift which is a sufficient evidence of his love to them; it being a large and comprehensive one, an irreversible and unspeakable one; no other than his own Son by nature, of the same essence, perfections, and glory with him; begotten by him in a way inconceivable and expressible by mortals; and his only begotten one; the object of his love and delight, and in whom he is ever well pleased; and yet, such is his love to the Gentiles, as well as Jews, that he has given him, in human nature, up, into the hands of men, and of justice, and to death itself:

    that whosoever believeth in him, whether Jew or Gentile,

    should not perish, but have everlasting life; See Gill on Joh_3:15.

    (b) T. Bab. Avoda Zara, fol. 2. 1. (c) Ib. fol. 4. 1. Vid. T. Bab. Sanhedrin, fol. 91. 2. & Bereshit Rabba, fol. 11. 3. (d) Shirhashirim Rabba, fol. 24. 1. Jarchi & Kimchi in Zech. ix. 1. (e) Zohar in Gen. fol. 112. 2. (f) Zohar in Exod. fol. 15. 1, 2. (g) T. Hieros. Taaniot, fol. 64. 1. (h) Shemot Rabba, sect. 14. fol. 99. 4. (i) Ib sect. 11. fol. 98. 3. (k) T. Bab. Succa, fol. 55. 2.
    Grace to you,

    jak
    'Unless I am convinced by scripture and plain reason, my conscience is captive to the Word of God. I cannot and I will not recant anything, for to go against conscience would be neither right nor safe. God help me. Here I stand, I can do no other.'~~Martin Luther, 1521

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    Administrator Brandan's Avatar
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    Just a note on the John Gill Commentary - I purchased it! Yes, I bought it online for 200.00!!! But it was worth every penny. You can get it here: http://www.standardbearer.org

    Also you can read it online here: http://bible.5solas.org/gill.php
    This is my signature.

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    It is also FREE as a module with the GREAT Bible software e-Sword (thanks disciple).

    Grace to you,

    jak
    'Unless I am convinced by scripture and plain reason, my conscience is captive to the Word of God. I cannot and I will not recant anything, for to go against conscience would be neither right nor safe. God help me. Here I stand, I can do no other.'~~Martin Luther, 1521

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    Originally posted by Odyssey
    It is also FREE as a module with the GREAT Bible software e-Sword (thanks disciple).
    no prob. happy to be of service. i'm not sure why it's not available on sword yet (http://www.crosswire.org/sword/index.jsp).
    When I get a little money, I buy books; and if any is left, I buy food and clothes.
    --Erasmus

    A room without books is a body without soul.
    --Cicero

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