Pristine Grace

Trust
by Henry Mahan

     How blessed it would be for us, and for all who cross our paths, if we could put our theology into deeds and not mere words. We profess to believe in God's immutable sovereignty and then constantly mourn over our lot in life. We claim to believe in God's purpose and providence, but fill every ear that will listen with our discontent and our sad state of affairs. Usually those who do the most complaining have, in reality, the least to complain about; while those who have serious handicaps, heavy burdens, and deep sorrows find a reason to praise the Lord and rejoice in His blessings.

     I need not remind you of God's anger with Israel because of their murmuring, nor to remind you of the words of our Lord, "Take no anxious thought for what ye shall eat, drink, or wear," nor to remind you of the words of Paul, "Let your conversation be without covetousness, and be content with such things as ye have." No! I need not remind you of these words; for you have read them, taught them, and perhaps preached them. Then, our problem is not ignorance of the Word and will of God (perhaps it would be better if this were our problem); our problem is identified in Heb. 4:2, "The word preached did not profit them, not being mixed with faith in them that heard it." It is a heart problem, for out of the heart the mouth speaks.

     And truthfully, our complaints are not with men, who are but second causes, but with God WHOM WE SAY is the First Cause and Lord of our lives. I can understand the free-willer (whose god is but a puppet of man's permission) complaining, murmuring, and finding fault with all about him. But the most inconsistent person living is the professed Christian who says he believes, "The Most High rules in the kingdom of men and giveth it to whomsoever He will," or, "In everything give thanks; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you;" and then he fills the air about with a constant stream of complaints and reasons why he should be somewhere else, or doing something else, or blessed in a more abundant measure. A certain cure for anxious care is trust. "Tho' he slay me, yet will I trust Him."